Words from the First World War Australian Home Front

by Amanda Laugesen

During the First World War, soldiers who served overseas used and developed a great deal of slang. Much attention has been devoted to studying this slang (see for example, A.G. Pretty’s ‘Glossary of Slang and Peculiar Terms used in the A.I.F.’), but we know far less of the words of the home front. While those on the home front knew the words of war to some extent, as this language was reported on in the press and found in letters sent home from soldiers, there was also a vocabulary distinctive to the Australian home front experience.

Anzac Day procession 1917, Brisbane

Anzac Day procession 1917, Brisbane

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On the job: ‘darl’ and ‘old mate’

by Christina Greer*

Like many students, I have supported myself through university by working in various hospitality jobs. We learn pretty quickly how to adapt our behaviour and language to different situations on the job. We talk to our co-workers in one way, our manager in another, and there are many ways in which we can address customers, depending on such things as their sex and age, the formality of the venue, and whether they are in a group or alone. Our intention is to be polite and to avoid giving offence. Wait staff are constantly, though not necessarily consciously, adjusting their language in the work place to suit the customer. Continue reading

Sparrow ticket (Word of the Month for April 2014)

A caption from the Adelaide 'Mail', 18th February 1933, via Trove digitised newspapers (National Library of Australia)

A caption from the Adelaide ‘Mail’, 18th February 1933, via Trove digitised newspapers (National Library of Australia)

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for April is ‘sparrow ticket’: a means of gaining admission to, or viewing, an event such as a sporting match without paying for a ticket. A term that was quite common in the first half of the 20th century but is rarely found in written records today. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.