Words from our Word Box: update 13

Click on the logo to go to the Word Box page

Click on the logo to go to the Word Box page

by the ANDC team

This is the final update for 2015 on contributions to our Word Box, the website feature you can use to alert us to new or unfamiliar words and phrases. These contributions allow us to identify new material for our archive of Australian words, and also for our general Australian Oxford dictionaries. We encourage you to contribute—just click on the Word Box image to the left to post your word. A few of the more interesting contributions from the last three months are discussed below; some are new to us, and some we already know. We welcome any comments about your understanding or experience of these words, and look forward to your contributions to Word Box.

dogfood

dogfood – (of a company’s staff) to use a product or service developed by the company before it is commercially available. Also found in the nominal form dogfooding and in the phrase to eat one’s own dogfood. The phrasal form is found in the 1980s and came to prominence in the computer software sector in the 1990s. The origin of the term is uncertain, but it may derive from US advertisements for Alpo dog food, in which the spokesperson refers to feeding the product to his own dogs.

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schmick up (Word of the Month for November 2015)

bond

 

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for November 2015 is ‘schmick up’: to smarten (something) up; to renovate (something); to improve (something) superficially. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

flagfall (Word of the Month for October 2015)

flag

 

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for October 2015 is ‘flagfall’: 1. an initial minimum hiring charge for a taxi, as part of the overall fare. 2. a fixed initial charge incurred when making a call on a mobile phone. The term derives from the small mechanical lever, a flag, which early taxis used to indicate if the taxi was for hire. While the taxi sense of ‘flagfall’ dates to the early 20th century, the mobile phone sense is recorded from the 1990s. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Words from our Word Box: update 12

Click on the logo to go to the Word Box page

Click on the logo to go to the Word Box page

by the ANDC team

This is the third update for 2015 on contributions to our Word Box, the website feature you can use to alert us to new or unfamiliar words and phrases. These contributions allow us to identify new material for our archive of Australian words, and also for our general Australian Oxford dictionaries. We encourage you to contribute—just click on the Word Box image to the left to post your word. A few of the more interesting contributions from the last three months are discussed below; some are new to us, and some we already know. We welcome any comments about your understanding or experience of these words, and look forward to your contributions to Word Box.

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Become an etymologist for a day—help us with ‘Sam Tick’

by Mark Gwynn

etymology

One of the most unsatisfying aspects of researching and writing a dictionary entry is not being able to determine the origin of a word. The study of a word’s history and origin—its etymology—is just one part of the dictionary-maker’s task. Often the etymology of a word can be readily identified: it may derive from another word, a particular language, or the name of a person, a place, or a product. Take the Australian English word dunny (a toilet) for example. It derives from a British dialect word dunnekin (a privy), and is probably ultimately derived from a combination of dung (faeces) and ken (a house). How do we arrive at this conclusion? Continue reading

CUB (Word of the Month for September 2015)

imgres

 

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for September 2015 is ‘CUB’: an affluent bogan. ‘Cub’ is an acronym from ‘cashed-up bogan’. In Australian English ‘cashed-up’ refers to a person who is well supplied with money, and ‘bogan’ is a person usually regarded as unsophisticated and uncultured, typically one from a low socioeconomic background. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Tip turkey (Word of the Month for August 2015)

by the ANDC staff

tip turkey for blog

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for August 2015 is ‘tip turkey’: the white ibis, Threskiornis moluccus, often regarded as a pest in urban areas because of its scavenging at tips, etc. The evidence for this term goes back to 2009. The increasing numbers of these birds found scavenging from bins in parks and in other urban areas has led to a number of similar epithets including ‘bin chicken’ and ‘dump chook’. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

Hoon operation (Word of the Month for July 2015)

Hoon 1

 

by the ANDC staff

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for July 2015 is ‘hoon operation’: a police campaign targeting dangerous drivers. This term goes back to the early 2000s. The word ‘hoon’ in Australian English goes back to the early 20th century when it referred to a pimp. Since the 1980s ‘hoon’ has been applied to young people who drive cars dangerously. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

Hubbard (Word of the Month for June 2015)

by the ANDC team

unfashionable

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for June 2015 is ‘hubbard’: an inexperienced, unskilled, or unfashionably attired cyclist. The disparaging term ‘hubbard’ is frequently found on Australian blog sites dedicated to cycling. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

Footwear in Australian English

Oz shoe

by Mark Gwynn

There are a number of terms in Australian English related to footwear. Several of these are associated with footwear worn originally by workers in rural areas of Australia, where sturdy boots were necessary in industries such as farming and droving, and for working in rugged outback terrain. Our beach culture too has generated terms for boots and shoes. A number of Australianisms related to footwear are discussed below. Continue reading