Words from our Word Box: update 10

by the ANDC team

Click on the logo to go the Word Box page

Click on the logo to go the Word Box page

This is the first update for 2015 on contributions to our Word Box, the website feature you can use to alert us to new or unfamiliar words and phrases. These contributions allow us to identify new material for our archive of Australian words, and also for our general Australian Oxford dictionaries. We encourage you to contribute—just click on the Word Box image to the left to post your word. A few of the more interesting contributions from the last three months are discussed below; some are new to us, and some we already know. We welcome any comments about your understanding or experience of these words, and look forward to your contributions this year. Continue reading

Ned Kelly beard (Word of the Month for March 2015)

by the ANDC team

Photograph of Ned Kelly on  the day before his execution

Photograph of Ned Kelly on the day before his execution

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for March 2015 is ‘Ned Kelly beard’: a full beard. Like many men of the late 19th century, Australia’s most famous bushranger Ned Kelly sported a large bushy beard. In recent times the full beard has made a comeback in Australia, and so has the term ‘Ned Kelly beard’ which is first recorded from the 1930s. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

Eggshell blonde (Word of the Month for February 2015)

Peter Garrett, AM. Perhaps Australia's most recognisable 'eggshell blonde'.

Peter Garrett, AM. Perhaps Australia’s most recognisable ‘eggshell blonde’.

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for February 2015 is ‘eggshell blonde’: a man with a bald head. Evidence for ‘eggshell blonde’ is found in newspaper evidence from the 1940s. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

Wine in Australian English

 

by Mark Gwynn

oz wine

A vineyard visitor

In Australia the nation’s drinking culture is traditionally associated with beer, but in recent years the sale of wine has surpassed that of the amber fluid. Australian wines are now sold and consumed in vast quantities here and around the world. While the increasing consumption of wine is a relatively recent phenomenon, terms associated with this beverage have a much longer history in Australian English. Australia produces many fine wines; however, many of the wine-related terms in the lexicon relate to cheap and inferior wine, as the examples below illustrate. Continue reading

Fridging (Word of the Month for January 2015)

A refrigerator in the outback. Source: Michael Perini (news.com.au)

A refrigerator in the outback. Source: Michael Perini (news.com.au)

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for January 2015 is ‘fridging’: the act of stealing from an outdoor refrigerator. Evidence for ‘fridging’ is found in newspaper evidence from 2010, and is commonly reported in northern and western Australia. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

Words from our Word Box: update 9

Click on the logo to go the Word Box page

Click on the logo to go to the Word Box page

by the ANDC team

This is the final update for 2014 on contributions to our Word Box, the website feature you can use to alert us to new or unfamiliar words and phrases. These contributions allow us to identify new material for our archive of Australian words, and also for our general Australian Oxford dictionaries. We encourage you to contribute—just click on the Word Box image to the left to post your word. A few of the more interesting contributions from the last three months are discussed below; some are new to us, and some we already know. We welcome any comments about your understanding or experience of these words. Thank you to everyone who has contributed to our Word Box this year.

Continue reading

Australian National Dictionary Centre’s Word of the Year 2014

Each year the ANDC selects a Word of the Year. The words chosen for the shortlist are not necessarily new, or exclusively Australian, but are selected on the basis of having come to some prominence in the Australian social and cultural landscape during the year. This year one word stood out for its presence in Australian politics and the media. We have selected shirtfront as our Word of the Year 2014.

shirtfront ‘in figurative use, to challenge or confront a person’.

Prime Minster Abbott and President Putin at the G20 Summit in Brisbane

Prime Minster Abbott and President Putin at the G20 Summit in Brisbane

Shirtfront is transferred from a term used in Australian Rules football, where it refers to a type of hip-and-shoulder bump of an opponent, and is also found in Rugby, where it refers to grabbing an opponent’s jersey. Prime Minister Tony Abbott used the word in a press conference when asked whether he would raise the issue of the downing of flight MH17 with Russian President Vladimir Putin: Continue reading

Billzac (Word of the Month for December 2014)

Private Harry Victor Turner, who served with the 16th Battalion at Gallipoli, 1915. Source: State Library of South Australia

Private Harry Victor Turner, who served with the 16th Battalion at Gallipoli, 1915. Source: State Library of South Australia

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for December is ‘Billzac’: a typical Australian soldier. ‘Billzac’ was one of a number of nicknames given to Australian soldiers during the First World War. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

‘Billzac’ is one of the many terms discussed in ANDC director Amanda Laugesen’s new book Furphies and Whizz-Bangs: Anzac Slang from the Great War. This book is now available from Oxford University Press.

The story of ‘dinkum’

by Bruce Moore

Bruce Moore is a former director of the Australian National Dictionary Centre, who is currently editing the second edition of the Australian National Dictionary. The following is an extract from his book What’s their Story? A History of Australian Words (published by Oxford University Press Australia, 2010).

What's their Story? gives a detailed account of many of the iconic words in Australian English.

What’s their Story? gives a detailed account of many of the iconic words in Australian English.

Dinkum and its variant fair dinkum are among the central Australian terms. Australian English has had two other terms with much the same meaning as dinkum—‘fair; genuine; honest; true’—but they are no longer used. Jonick was one of them, and it appeared in Australia in the 1870s as a variant of jannock ‘fair, straightforward’, a word that has widespread use in English dialects. It became obsolete in Australia by the 1950s. The second term, ryebuck, is probably a Yiddish word and a variant of German reibach ‘profit’. It became common in Australia in the 1890s as an expression of agreement or assent (much the same as ‘all right’) and as an adjective meaning ‘good, excellent’. As with jonick, it had largely disappeared by the 1950s, although it has been retained as the title of a popular Australian folk song ‘The Ryebuck Shearer’ (the expert or ‘gun’ shearer). Dinkum, however, has been such a strong word in Australian English, that synonyms have hardly been necessary. The word dinkum is first recorded in Australian English in 1890. Continue reading

Snowball march (Word of the Month for November 2014)

An example of a 'snowball march'. This particular one was a 'Kangaroo recruiting march' held near Wallendbeen, NSW, c. 1915. Source:  Australian War Memorial

An example of a ‘snowball march’. This particular one was a ‘Kangaroo recruiting march’ held near Wallendbeen, NSW, c. 1915. Source: Australian War Memorial

by the ANDC team

The Oxford Word of the Month is written by members of the Australian National Dictionary Centre and published each month by Oxford University Press Australia. Each Word of the Month looks at an Australian word or term in some detail, providing a history of the term and its role in current Australian society. If you wish to receive Word of the Month by email you can subscribe at the Oxford University Press Australia website.

Our Word of the Month for November is ‘snowball march’: a march held during the First World War to encourage recruitment, particularly from rural areas. There were a number of such marches held in the First World War period – some were known by other names including ‘cooee march’ and ‘kangaroo march’. You can read the full Word of the Month in PDF form on our website or read it in an online format.

‘Snowball march’ is one of the many terms discussed in ANDC director Amanda Laugesen’s new book Furphies and Whizz-Bangs: Anzac Slang from the Great War. This book is now available from Oxford University Press.